GRAND RAPIDS, Mich. (WOOD) – More home fires occur during the winter months than in any other season with half of all home heating fires happening in December, January and February.

Michael McLeeier from E.S.C.A.P.E. Fire Safety joined the eightWest team to talk about how we can stay safe this winter.

For more information and resources, visit EscapeInc.org.



It’s #FirePreventionWeek!  This year’s theme is Learn the Sounds of Fire Safety! ™  E.S.C.A.P.E. Inc. president and founder firefighter Michael McLeieer talks to Ken Lanphear on the WKZO AM 590 and FM 106.9 Morning Show about this year’s theme and steps you and your family can take to prevent a home fire and stay safe.

Here is a link to the live interview on Monday October 4, 2021 at 6:50 a.m.:

 

The next stop of the day was in Grand Rapids on eightWest at WOOD TV 8 at the downtown Media Art Center Studio inside the Grand Rapids Art Museum at Rosa Park Circle.

Here is the link to that broadcast:

 




Plan, practice and pick a place, 3 very important things that can save lives in the event of a fire. This is fire prevention month and today eightWest has Michael McLeieer with E.S.C.A.P.E. Fire Safety and the President of the Michigan Association of Fire Chiefs, Dave Glotzbach in studio with us.

  • Plan and Practice your escape
  • Pick a meeting place once outside
  • Call 911 from a neighbor’s house or your cell phone
  • Close the bedroom door when you sleep

Call 844-978-4400 or email escape@wotv4women.com for free alarms

 



When was the last time you checked your smoke alarm? Since January 1st, Michigan has experienced 25 fire fatalities and remains a leading state for home fire deaths.  These deaths have occurred in homes that did not have working smoke alarms. E.S.C.A.P.E. Fire Safety reminds you that properly installed and maintained smoke alarms on every level of your home are the only mitigation devices that can alert you and your family to a fire 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Whether you’re awake or asleep, a working smoke alarm is constantly on alert, scanning the air for fire and smoke.

Take the opportunity when you move the clocks forward one hour at 2 a.m. on Sunday March 11th, to make sure you test your smoke and carbon monoxide alarms and replace the batteries as needed.  Also replace alarms that are over 10 years old.

According to the National Fire Protection Association, almost two-thirds of home fire deaths resulted from fires in properties without working smoke alarms. A working smoke alarm significantly increases your chances of surviving a deadly home fire.

There are many different brands of smoke alarms available on the market, but they fall under two basic types: ionization and photoelectric.

It cannot be stated definitively that one is better than the other in every fire situation that could arise in a residence.  Because both ionization and photoelectric smoke alarms are better at detecting distinctly different, yet potentially fatal fires, and because no one can predict what type of fire might start in a home, the United States Fire Administration recommends that every residence and place where people sleep be equipped with:

  • Both ionization AND photoelectric smoke alarms, OR
  • dual sensor smoke alarms, which contain both ionization and photoelectric smoke sensors

In addition to the basic types of alarms, there are alarms made to meet the needs of people with hearing disabilities. These alarms may use strobe lights that flash and/or vibrate to assist in alerting those who are unable to hear standard smoke alarms when they sound.

Smoke alarms are powered by a battery or they are hardwired into the home’s electrical system. If the smoke alarm is powered by battery, it runs on either a disposable 9-volt battery or a non-replaceable 10-year lithium (“long-life”) battery. A backup battery is usually present on hardwired alarms and may need to be replaced.

These batteries must be tested on a regular basis and, in most cases, should be replaced at least once each year (except for lithium batteries).

Install smoke alarms on every level of your home, including the basement. Many fatal fires begin late at night or early in the morning, so the U.S. Fire Administration recommends installing smoke alarms both inside and outside of sleeping areas.

Since smoke and many deadly gases rise, installing your smoke alarms at the proper level will provide you with the earliest warning possible. Always follow the manufacturer’s installation instructions.

Smoke alarms are not expensive and are worth the lives they can help save. Ionization and photoelectric smoke alarms cost between $6 and $20. Dual sensor smoke alarms cost between $24 and $40.

Some fire departments offer reduced price, or even free, smoke alarms and may install battery operated smoke alarms in your home at no cost. Contact your local fire department’s non-emergency phone number for more information or e-mail escape@wotv4women.com for more details on a smoke alarm installation program close to Where You Live!



For 20 years now, Michael McLeieer of E.S.C.A.P.E. Inc. has been teaching children and adults about fire prevention. Now his work and dedication has earned him a national awardthe 2016 Fire Prevention and Education Award.

The award, sponsored by Nest, was established in memory of volunteer firefighter and NVFC board member Marc Mueller. Each year, it honors a person who has made a major contribution in the field of fire prevention.

McLeieer founded E.S.C.A.P.E. more than 20 years ago to teach children and adults about fire prevention, CPR, and first aid. He is a regular at Maranda Park Parties every summer, spreading his message of fire safety to more than a million children in West Michigan.

Lt. McLeieer will be recognized at a banquet on May 6, 2016, in Alexandria, Virginia. To read more about his accomplishments and the award, click here.

 



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October 4 through 10 is Fire Prevention Week. This year’s fire prevention theme is “Hear the BEEP where you SLEEP! Every bedroom needs a working smoke alarm.” Michigan has seen a dramatic increase in home fires resulting in injury and death. This listing provides numerous opportunities for children and families to learn about fire safety, injury prevention, and smoke alarm maintenance close to Where You Live. If you have questions about fire prevention and safety or need a smoke alarm, e-mail escape@wotv4women.com.

>>> List of fire department open houses

ESCAPE Inc. is celebrating 20 years in West Michigan! See the ESCAPE smoke demonstration trailer and Jake the Fire Safety Dog at Zoo Goes Boo at John Ball Zoo on Saturday, October 17. There will be experts to answer questions and free fire prevention materials between 10 a.m. and 3 p.m.




Our homes will be filled with family and friends in the days and weeks ahead, so now is a good time to go over safety tips to help keep everyone safe this holiday season. Firefighter Michael McLeieer of E.S.C.A.P.E. and Jake the Fire Safety Dog have these tips:

•Be on alert! Don’t cook if you’re sleepy or have consumed alcohol
•Stand by your pan! Don’t leave the kitchen while you are cooking. If you do, turn off the stove.
•Set a timer to remind you that you are cooking
•Keep all flammables away from the stovetop
•Turn handles of pots and pans to the side (inside)
•Wear short or tight sleeves when cooking
•Cook on back burners first
•Keep kids away from cooking area – maintain a three-foot kid-free zone
•Have activities set up to keep kids out of the kitchen
•Double check to make sure burners are off when you’re finished
•Make sure your smoke alarms are working

Other Safety Tips:
•Cover outlets
•Put your prescriptions away. Pills look like candy to kids.
•Introduce visiting kids to pets gently or use a baby gate to keep them apart